Tag Archives: Cape Networks

Mobility Field 2 Shows Evolving Nature of WLAN Industry

MFD2The “Tech Field Day” series of events has been  an important part of my professional development life for the last several years. I’ve had the good fortune to be a frequent delegate, and I have watched Wireless Field Day (WFD) morph into Mobility Field Day (MFD) in parallel with the changing nature of the WLAN industry. As we get ready to descend upon Silicon Valley for MFD2, I can’t help but think about what this round of vendor participants says about the general state of WLAN things.

This go round, you won’t see the usual suspects many folks think of when contemplating enterprise Wi-Fi. MFD2 is more about performance measurement and alternatives to the WLAN same-old with Mist Systems, Nyansa, Cape Networks, Mojo Networks, and another performance measurement vendor to be announced soon.

So why no bigtime flashy AP makers?

Here’s my take on that, and there are a few contributing factors:

  • The biggest guns have relegated their WLAN parts and pieces to non-headline status. Each has declared “We’re a software company!” of late, and is now devoting time to weaving together Intent-Based Network Fabrics With SDN Flavor Crystals. And… they have their own hyper-glitzy events where non-technical Hollywood-types make attendees swoon. Meh.
  • Extreme Networks is buying up almost everyone else, so the number of competing players is decreasing.
  • Ubiquiti is now #3 in market share, and seemingly needs none of these events to get their message of “economy-priced but half-way decent networking” out to the masses.

By now, WLAN is so tightly integrated with the rest of the network (in most environments) it doesn’t command the stand-alone Wow Factor it once did. But… in the rush to build feature-heavy (I’d even say “gratuitously bloated”, but I can be a wanker about these things) super systems, the big guns haven’t done all that well in natively providing many of the capabilities that MFD 2’s vendors will be briefing us (and those tuning in live) on.

From innovative ways of showing what’s really going on with a given WLAN to to fresh approaches to WLAN architecture (as opposed to butting an API into years’ old code and declaring it new SDN), MFD2 will be interesting.

If you tune in live and would like to get a question to the vendors as they present their stuff, make sure to hit up a Delegate or two via Twitter so we can ask on your behalf.

 

 

 

Getting to Know Cape Networks

I recently attended the 2017 edition of the Wireless LAN Professionals conference in Phoenix. As usual, it was awesome. Catching up with old friends who are scattered far and wide, hearing information-rich presentations, and meeting new people with their own wireless story made it a very enriching week for me. But part of my learning actually came after the conference. I was saying my goodbyes when a gent named David Wilson asked for a few minutes of my time, and that’s how I would come to know of Cape Networks.

It turns out that Wilson and his travel partner Michael Champanis are two of the co-founders of Cape Networks. These guys were awesome to talk with at the end of a long week, and the conversation flowed easily. I learned that Cape Networks is based in both South Africa and San Francisco, and is trying to raise their brand awareness here in the US. The company is in the business of Wi-Fi performance monitoring and testing through deployed sensors and a deceptively simple cloud dashboard.

I was given a demo of the Cape dashboard and got to handle the low-profile sensors. We talked of how the system finds issues and helps with resolution, and what customers are already using it.None of us was in a particular hurry since our travel arrangements were all later in the evening, so they patiently handled every one of the many questions that came to me during the demo.

I’m hoping to get a couple of sensors in the near future, and to be able to do a proper review. Until then, I can share that the solution looks interesting and of decent quality with the potential to reveal information that other systems I’ve looked at or used don’t really do very well. At the same time, I’m not endorsing Cape Networks here as I haven’t used the solution yet.

But I did find them interesting, with enough potential differentiators that I felt it worth sharing what little I know of Cape so far. Once I do a review on their hardware and dashboard, I’ll be sure to follow up.

Meanwhile, I encourage anyone running business WLAN systems to have a look at Cape Networks’ web site and to learn about a company that you may not have been aware of yet.