Category Archives: Open-Mesh

Open Mesh Brings Major Disruption to SMB Space, Goes Full-Stack

Another router coming to the SMB market generally isn’t that exciting, but this one is different for a number of reasons.

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For one thing, it comes from Open Mesh. Those ports are part of the G200, which is the first router ever released by Open Mesh. It has a list price of $249 dollars, and it also brings the Open Mesh product line into the proverbial “full stack” domain.

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Now customers can use access points, switches, and the G200 all from Open Mesh, and all cloud-managed in the excellent CloudTrax dashboard with no license costs.

Yes, you heard me right… I said “with no license costs”. If you are not familiar with Open Mesh, the operational paradigm is easy- you buy your components (routers, switches, and access points), you register them in the CloudTrax dashboard, and off you go with configuration and operation. CloudTrax is a pretty decent network management system in and of itself, and it is the only way you manage Open Mesh components. It’s simple, it’s feature rich, and given what Open Mesh hardware costs, the entire paradigm is an absolute steal compared to pricing and complexity of enterprise solutions that masquerade as SMB-friendly.

The G200 is a significant milestone to not only the Open Mesh product line, but also to the SMB market in that it seriously drops upfront costs and TCO while providing what may be the easiest to use interface among any of it’s competitors.

But what do you get for under $250 for features with the G200? A lot, actually. From a resource perspective, Open Mesh promises gigabit throughput compliments of a quad-core processor and dedicated crypto engine. The G200 has two passive PoE ports for Open Mesh APs to connect directly, and also has an SFP port for fiber uplink to an Open Mesh switch or 3rd party vendor switch. All the typical “router stuff” is onboard, from VLAN support, DHCP server and firewall to decent traffic classification, QoS, NAT functionality, user VPN, and even usage statistics. Not bad for an initial edge-router at this price point, that won’t hit you up in 12 months for a fat license fee to keep using it. Mine has been reliable as I could ask for in the couple of weeks that I’ve been testing it. One gripe- no site-to-site VPN, although that is coming.

g200

I can’t stress how important price is for the SMB space, and I know some of my own customers are dealing with sticker shock that comes from other cloud-managed solutions that charge big and small environments the same way when it comes to licensing (or worse, they penalize the small networks for not having volume purchasing leading to better pricing). If Open Mesh continues to evolve their edge functionality and hardware offerings, this vendor could deliver a sales smack-down to the bigger players who have become license-happy to the point of ridiculousness over the last few years.

A New Access Point and Switch, Too!

I’m a huge fan of the Open Mesh A60 dual-band indoor/outdoor 802.11ac access point. It has been the top-dog of the Open Mesh access point line for several months, with a list price of $225 (again, no licensing and free CloudTrax support). Now, as part of the same product announcement that features the G200 router, Open Mesh is also bringing out it’s new A62 access point. It’s still dual-band and indoor/outdoor, but this Wave 2 AP also sports two 5 GHz radios, support for up to an estimated 150 streaming clients, and the same $225 price tag as the A60.

The latest S24 switch also breaks new ground for Open Mesh with 10 Gbps SFP+ uplink ports and a higher PoE power budget than it’s predecessor.

Let’s Do Some Math

Open Mesh has over 100,000 network customers around the world. When I think of one of my own small sites that’s up for renewal with another cloud vendor, I’m looking at trying to explain to my customer why a 3-year renewal license on old AP costs almost as much as purchasing the latest license-free AP from Open Mesh, and why a 3-year renewal license on an older security appliance costs almost twice the price of a new Open Mesh G200 router that would never need another license. These are real dollars for small businesses, and you pay the big price for the other guys whether you ever use actual support or not.

It’s time for a shake-up at this end of the market, and I think Open Mesh is the vendor to do it.

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Open Mesh Adds Switches To CloudTrax

I wrote about Open Mesh right here back in 2014. Though I run a number of “brand-name” networks that range in size from small to humongous, I also have a real appreciation for non-mainstream vendors that bring a compelling story. Open Mesh is at the top of my list in that regard, for a number of reasons:

  • I believe in the effectiveness of cloud-managed networking
  • I get tired of huge licensing fees
  • I don’t believe that every environment needs a feature list longer than my arm, and the pricing and code bugs that go with it
  • I like a company that empathizes with the customer when it comes to TCO, versus ramming contrived performance tests down our collective throats to justify stratospheric pricing
  • I like rooting for “the little guy” as long as that little guy is legit

Now, back to Open Mesh.. Let’s play a quick game.

Riddle me this: what model AP is in the following picture?

ap

Is it-

a. Bluesocket (Adtran) 1920 AP
b. AirTight (Mojo Networks) C-55 AP
c. Open Mesh MR1750 AP
d. Any one of several other APs that look like this

The answer? It’s ALL of them. I currently have two of the Open Mesh MR 1750 3×3 11ac APs in test at Wirednot HQ. As you can hopefully see, Open Mesh has opted to use a fairly popular “industry standard” AP form factor (though the other APs listed are actually 11n). This decent-quality AP lists for $225 and requires NO LICENSE to use with the excellent CloudTrax dashboard (shown here).

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CloudTrax is peppy, well laid-out, and suffers none of the browser wonkiness of certain NMS systems. Open Mesh has done a great job with providing cost-effective cloud-enabled Wi-Fi, and they have a loyal following despite not being heavy on advertising. That’s a good thing… which just got even better.

Now, Open Mesh has switches.

Like Open Mesh’s APs, the new switches are priced to sell and are also managed WITHOUT LICENSES in CloudTrax. Here’s my own S24.

cloudtrax2

Between the APs and switches, Open Mesh provides a lot of value. Though the product set is arguably lacking a router/gateway component, it still has to be experienced to be believed. It’s that good, for that cheap.

Caveats: I should mention that I’m not huge on the use of mesh in any WLAN setting. This is where one AP uses radio for backhaul to another AP to eventually find it’s way to the wired network. It cuts throughput way down, and can be wonky depending on the vendor. Open Mesh has a strong history in using mesh connectivity. While I’m a fan of Open Mesh, I tend to run every AP home-run with it’s own UTP except for the absolute rare case where that’s not possible.

In my simple testing, Open Mesh is standing up well to Meraki, Ubiquiti, Ruckus, and Aruba APs in what approximates an SMB environment. I’m not in an HD setting, nor am I attempting to do any sort of conclusion-seeking performance bake-off. At the same time, there’s been nothing I’ve thrown at the MR1750s on the S24 switch that they can’t handle as well as any of the other APs I run. I’m not advocating ripping out your enterprise network for Open Mesh, but I can say that it’s absolutely worth looking at and judging for yourself.