Quien es Mas Macho? A Beacon Battery Brouhaha!

There’s not a lot of networky substance here, so if you’re looking for that, well- you just keep moving. But, if you’ve been following what’s going on with beacons and location services that use these little gems, you might want to keep reading.

I give you… Exhibit A.

Beacon2

At the top, we see The Aruba (Meridian) BT-100 beacon, which was given to me at Wireless Field Day 8 as I sipped a cold one and got briefed on lofty tech topics at Levi’s Stadium by Aruba’s SMEs (I run in those circles). At the bottom, we have the Gimbal beacon, by Qualcomm. This was another freebie, which I scored during a promotion. Each has it’s place in the beacon universe, with the power to help build amazing success stories in the field of location based applications and services.

This isn’t a Beacon X vs Beacon Y smackdown in the making- but it is an opportunity to point out a pretty important point about beacons.

I give you… Exhibit B.

beacon 1

Using my world-class Leatherman Skeletool CX (special Kieth Parsons Edition), I jimmied my way into the innards of each beacon with the precision maneuvers of a skilled surgeon. And what I saw made me do some thinkin’ about the powerful lonely feeling that grips a man when batteries go dead and whatever the thingy is in play stops working. Which brings me to the points of this blog:

  • Some batteries are bigger than others
  • Bigger batteries have more capacity
  • More batteries combine for more capacity
  • More batteries that are bigger combine for even more capacity

Sounds so simple, right? The implications aren’t so profound if whatever you’re doing with beacons only needs a few of them in easy-to-reach places. But I have been to Levi’s Stadium, oh yes I have, and I can testify that copious amounts of beacons are in use and not all are easy to get to. This is an example of a place where beacon battery brevity blows. 

You want loooong battery life in many beacon situations, and out of the box the BT-100 promises an impressive 1,460 days. For those not up on Common Core math yet, that equals 4 years. By contrast, the Gimbal above is rated for “many months” (I got about 6-7 months out of mine).

The Gimbal uses the CR2032 battery, whereas the BT-100 uses two of the phat-daddy CR2477 cells. This is the biggest “watch battery” I’ve ever seen, personally.

What’s the Big Deal?

To me, battery refresh on deployed beacons has the potential to significantly add to total TCO where hundreds are deployed, especially if ladders need to be climbed and maintenance windows need to be followed. This simple example shows that not all beacons will have the same battery life, based solely on the battery used (note- I’m leaving out some important operational parameters that impact battery life, but these are beyond what I’m trying to get across here).

There are many, many more beacons on the market than just these two, but if you’re going down the beacon path, make sure you consider expected battery life as you make your choices.


Just getting started with beacons? Here are a couple of blogs I wrote up as I went from knowing absolutely nothing about beacons to knowing enough to be able to not be totally clueless.

Beacon Baby Steps
A Little More on Beacons

4 thoughts on “Quien es Mas Macho? A Beacon Battery Brouhaha!

  1. gcatewifi

    Data, then voice, and now RTLS is close to becoming a “standard” for designing a WLAN. Beacons and all the different vendor models is a large part of this. Thanks for bringing the details to us (and I always love to “tear” stuff apart!).

    Reply
  2. wirednot Post author

    Thanks for reading, Glenn- and for the comment. Our wireless world is certainly getting more complicated. I’m still not doing much for real with beacons, but can see where this adds a whole other dimension to both design and upkeep.

    Reply
  3. Pingback: My Wireless Field Day 8 Posts | wirednot

  4. Pingback: Quien es Mas Macho? A Beacon Battery Brouhaha! - Tech Field Day

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