Cradlepoint Introduces a Beauty

(Quick edit, 8/17/15)

Of late, I’ve had a few opportunities to learn more about the mobile edge router space and the really powerful feature sets that exist in this market. I’ve been briefed by the big players on how their gear is winning over traditional networking in a variety of scenarios, and how slick tools like cloud management and SDR (software defined radio) make mobile edge gear pretty advanced in capability. Read more on the general topic of 4G edge-routing developments with a piece I wrote for Network Computing.

Cradlepoint’s latest announcement provides a great example of the impressive tech in play in this unique realm that creatively puts networking in a variety of interesting places, from public transportation fleets to retail kiosks that pop up and disappear as events come and go to permanent locations like restaurants and gas stations. The new product is the AER3100, and with it’s specifications and flexibility, it’s going to fast find it’s way into all of the markets that Cradlepoint serves with micro-branch/mobile and small branch style offerings.

Here’s the quick view, stolen from Cradlepoint’s web site:

AER3100

This is light-years past simple personal hotspot kind of 4G modem kit. If you ever get an opportunity to take a briefing with Cradlepoint, you’ll realize that the businesses using these sorts of components have a lot to lose by making poor choices with their networking, from lost revenue to data breeches. Cradlepoint seems to have covered all of the bases with robust security, multi-carrier support, and legitimate enterprise network feature sets (including 11ac support on the WI-Fi side) in small components that just happen to get their ISP connectivity generally via 4G.

Give the Tech Specs a look, and see if you’re not as impressed as I was when I first got familiar with them:


Technical Specifications

WAN

  • Integrated 4G LTE (with 3G failover) Multi-Carrier Software-Defined radio
    • Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, Europe, and generic models available
    • Dual integrated modem option
    • Dual SIM slot in each modem
    • Most models include support for active GPS
  • 13 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports (WAN/LAN switchable)
  • WiFi as WAN (only on AER3100)
  • Failover/Failback
  • Load Balancing
  • Advance Modem Failure Check
  • WAN Port Speed Control
  • WAN/LAN Affinity
  • IP Passthrough

LAN

  • 13 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports (WAN/LAN switchable); Supports four ports of PoE (9-12) for class I, II, or III devices (up to 15W) or two ports high power PoE for class IV devices (up to 30W)
  • LLDP support
  • VLAN 802.1Q
  • DHCP Server, Client, Relay
  • DNS and DNS Proxy
  • DynDNS
  • Split DNS
  • UPnP
  • DMZ
  • Multicast/Multicast Proxy
  • QoS (DSCP and Priority Queuing)
  • MAC Address Filtering

MANAGEMENT

  • Cradlepoint Enterprise Cloud Manager¹
  • Web UI, API, CLI
  • GPS Location
  • Data Usage Alerts (router and per client)
  • Advanced Troubleshooting (support)²
  • Device Alerts
  • SNMP
  • SMS control
  • Console Port for Out-of-Band Management

¹Enterprise Cloud Manager requires a subscription
²Requires CradleCare Support

ROUTING

  • IPsec Tunnel – up to 40 concurrent sessions
  • OpenVPN (SSL VPN)¹
  • L2TP¹
  • GRE Tunnel
  • OSPF/BGP/RIP¹
  • Per-Interface Routing
  • Static Routing
  • NAT-less Routing
  • Virtual Server/Port Forwarding
  • VTI Tunnel Support
  • NEMO/DMNR¹
  • IPv6
  • VRRP¹
  • STP¹
  • NHRP¹

¹–Requires an ECM PRIME subscription or an Extended Enterprise License

SECURITY

  • RADIUS and TACACS+
  • 802.1x authentication for Wireless and Wired Networks
  • Zscaler Internet Security¹
  • Certificate support
  • ALGs
  • MAC Address Filtering
  • CP Secure Threat Management²
  • Advanced Security Mode (local user management only)
  • Per-Client Web Filtering
  • IP Filtering
  • Content Filtering (basic)
  • Website Filtering
  • Real-time clock with battery backup for CA certificate validation

¹–Requires Zscaler Internet Security License
²-Requires a CP Secure Threat Management license

PORTS AND BUTTONS

  • 54V DC Power
  • 13 10/100/1000 Ethernet LAN
  • Console port
  • Two cellular antenna connectors (SMA)
  • GPS antenna connector (SMA)
  • Lock compatible
  • External USB port for USB modem and/or firmware updates
  • Factory Reset

TEMPERATURE

  • 0° C to 50° C (32°F to 122°F) operating
  • −20° C to 70° C (−4°F to 158°F) storage
  • Redundant internal fans for reliable cooling

HUMIDITY (non-condensing)

  • 10% to 85% operating non-condensing
  • 5% to 90% storage non-condensing

POWER

  • 54VDC 2.25A adapter
  • 802.3af (15W) or 802.3at (30W) PoE capable

SIZE

  • 12.2 in x 10.6 in x 1.75 in (310 mm x 270 mm x 45 mm)
  • 1U height for rack mount

– See more at: https://cradlepoint.com/products/aer-3100#!specs


I’m new to this space when it comes to looking at it to any real depth. What I’ve seen so far makes me think beyond my own typical wired ISP approach to certain branch environments, and it does get fascinating when you contemplate robust networking being enabled anywhere you have halfway decent 4G coverage. I’ve really just skimmed the surface of a pretty big story here, and I look forward to learning more.

Do you work with Cradlepoint gear or competing mobile edge solutions? I’d love hear your take, and examples of success or failure with kind of solution.

3 thoughts on “Cradlepoint Introduces a Beauty

  1. apcsb

    Nice, piece of kit but nothing really new. You could do the same 5 years ago by taking an RFS4000 (or 4011 if you want a built-in AP) and sticking a 3G dongle into USB port. If course, no dual SIM and only 6PoE+ ports vs 13, but conceptually the same branch office all-in-one box.
    BTW – you still can do it with RFS4000 or even AP8xxx (they support USB-connected 3G dongles). No OpenVPN, though, I’m afraid, but there are other niceties.

    Reply
    1. wirednot Post author

      Arsen, thanks for reading. I know there are other ways to build similar feature sets, but its the completeness and flexibility in a tidy little little remotely manageable package that impresses me. Especially with the SDR aspects.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Wireless Field Day 8 Takes “Wireless” Up a Notch | wirednot

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